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Inverell Relay For Life hits $49K

Relay For Life’s round-the-clock Inverell charity event on March 19-20 for the NSW Cancer Council raised $49,040, and the event looks set to evolve in future.

Article and photo by Michèle Jedlicka at The Inverell Times

Though they did not meet the targeted amount, NSW Cancer Council New England community engagement co-ordinator Paul Hobson said the total was in line with the statewide trend.

“The actual income from Relays for Life are not yielding as much as they once did,” he said.

“But we're now in the process in finding out why this is happening, and whether not the relay itself needs to change a little bit of a format as to how it goes forward, or whether or not we just need to put a little bit more work into making sure people know that it’s on and how they can contribute.”

Paul said at the Inverell May 25 wrap-up meeting, the committee, led by chairwoman Sharon Staader and secretary Heather Hinton, indicated they are ready to plan the next Relay for Life, tentatively set for March 16 and 17, 2018.

Nigel the Toilet, the loveable practical pleasantry which made its way around Inverell’s business houses, added about $1000 toward the total to aid patients and their families across the district.

Of the services funded by Cancer Council, Inverell’s local government area has accessed the resources of Tamworth’s North West Cancer Centre’s Inala House accommodation at the highest rate in the region. 

“In 2015, Cancer Council NSW managed accommodation facility provided over $21,600 worth of free accommodation to the 92 cancer patients and carers from Inverell who spent 399 nights in Inala House,” Paul said.

“People who are having radiotherapy, often have to stay between six and eight weeks, in Tamworth.”

The twin-share units offer amenities and television, as well as free-breakfast, and shared kitchen, community television, activities and games.

“They find they enjoy that community aspect of bonding with the other people that are staying there as well,” Paul said.